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Springfest 2019 Triple Threat: 3OH!3 and Jeremih to Headline, with Performance by Skylar Grey

by Rose Brennan & Megan Dreher, Managing & A&E Editor & Editor-in-Chief

In what will be a first for Manhattan College, Springfest will be a two-act show and celebration this semester.  On Saturday, April 13, 3OH!3, Jeremih and Skylar Grey will all perform for the college community.

In addition to hosting three artists for Springfest, several activities will be offered for students before the first performance.  Owing to an overarching theme of a carnival, the preliminary activities will include rides, beach volleyball, giant cup pong, a psychic, raffles and food.  At 1:00 p.m., Grey’s performance will begin, which will be immediately followed by 30H!3.  After 3OH!3’s performance, there will be another gap for activities, including karaoke and a prize hunt across campus.  At 7:00 p.m., a DJ will open for the second headliner, Jeremih.

The full day of activities and performances was largely orchestrated by senior Casey Monroe, vice president of social life.  She and student body president Jaycie Cooper worked in close collaboration with the Office of Student Engagement to book the artists for the event.

“I was the person who was … searching for the artist, talking to the agents, seeing how much the pricing was and things of that sort,” Monroe said.  “Everybody else within our group was obviously helping as well, because I think, at least from my opinion, we’re a very close-knit team, so any time I need to call on somebody else, it’s pretty easy.”

She continued.

“I was a huge part of finding the Springfest artist … and I’m very excited,” Monroe said.

This collaborative process was certainly not a short one.  Monroe estimated that finding and booking the artists took four to five months from start to finish.

“It was not easy,” Monroe said.  “I think a lot of people think that it’s just … ‘hey, I want this artist to come,’ and then boom, that’s the person that’s coming, when in reality, it took like at least four or five months to find somebody that was both a good fit for this school, who was appropriate, who was within our budget and who students would really enjoy.”

Jaycie Cooper echoed the struggles of finding a singular artist, let alone three, that appropriately fit the school in all aspects, particularly from a financial standpoint.

“For Quadchella, we didn’t have an artist, we just had student performers. That saved us in the ballpark of about $45,000, so we were able to transfer that money to Springfest,” Cooper said. “We saved the money where we could, because Springfest is really that one event of the year that appeals to all students and is likely the most attended event for the student body. Therefore, we feel it should be the biggest, the greatest, and should have the most funding for it.”

There were several reasons behind booking more than one artist for this year’s Springfest.  One of the key motivating factors for Monroe was planning an entire day of activities for the student body.

“In the past, it’s been … events, music artist at like 2:00 or 3:00 [p.m.] and it’s over.  And we really wanted to continue that party for students [and] have this be an all-day event,” Monroe said.

Cooper added, “There will be two rounds of food, games throughout campus– karaoke in Smith, activities and vendors in the Quad, field games in Jasper backyard, all trying to give more of that festival feel. We want to have as much as possible to keep people active on campus.”

But Cooper and Monroe both agreed that they wanted Springfest to have the broadest appeal possible for as many students as possible.  Hence, multiple artists across multiple genres were selected so everyone could enjoy something.

“We wanted to reach a number of different personality types, basically.  And so with the artists that we’ve chosen, we wanted to expand that that range,” Monroe said.  “So we wanted to get artists that were from multiple different styles so that people who like all different kinds of music could be able to enjoy Springfest in its entirety.”

Though Monroe was unable to mention other contending artists for this year’s Springfest, she did note that each of the possibilities were “in the same range, both pricing-wise and music style-wise as [the] current artist is.”

About The Quadrangle (1270 Articles)
The Quadrangle, founded in 1924, is the student-run newspaper of Manhattan College.
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