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Scatterbomb “Stranded in Pittsburgh” in Third Show of Semester

by ROSE BRENNAN & MADALYN JOHNSONA&E Editor & Asst. A&E Editor

In Scatterbomb’s third show of the semester, Fordham University’s improv group, Stranded in Pittsburgh, collaborated with MC students to reenact a body slapping musician group, a tapeworm romantically involved with its victim’s friend and various other chaotic scenarios suggested by the audience in Hayden 100.

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In Scatterbomb’s third show of the semester, Fordham University’s improv group, Stranded in Pittsburgh, collaborated with MC students MADALYN JOHNSON / THE QUADRANGLE

This collaboration was not the first of its kind, as the two groups also collaborated last year.  But a packed crowd and a packed stage certainly meant more excitement for all, especially with Stranded in Pittsburgh members Molly McCarthy ‘21, Lizzy Jerse ‘22, Nora Thomas ‘21 and Kevin Daley ‘22.

For MC junior Lauren Spagnuolo, this was not her first time seeing a Scatterbomb show, but it was her first time watching them collaborate with another group.

“Hopefully we’ll see some new comedic sketch[es]. This is actually my first time seeing them collab so I’m very excited to see what will happen, hopefully it will be super funny,” Spagnuolo said.

The show kicked off just after 8 p.m.  The guest members of the show were briefly introduced, and the original Scatterbomb members took the stage for the first half of the show.  Following the audience suggestion of “possum,” the show was on.

Scatterbomb members Meredith Taylor and Sydney Waitt, posing as animal control employees attempting to catch a “very fast turtle.”  Brendan Hainey tried to intervene in their chase, telling them the “very fast turtle” was actually his little brother in a turtle costume, and it was all a misunderstanding.  The grumpy old neighbor in the scene, however (played by Maria Thomas), insisted it was a turtle that should be caught.  All of this arguing was intermittently interrupted by the turtle/little brother dashing through the scene, played to hilarious perfection by Aedan Roney.

This scene was a favorite of many of the audience members.

“Scatterbomb was really funny tonight. My favorite part was definitely the part where they pretended to catch the really fast turtle in the beginning,” said sophomore James Curry.

Following a shortened version of Scatterbomb’s set, the four members of Stranded in Pittsburgh took the stage.

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This collaboration was not the first of its kind, as the two groups also collaborated last year. MADALYN JOHNSON / THE QUADRANGLE

In spite of the historic rivalry between Fordham and MC, the guests were fairly well-received, covering everything from scarecrows in fields to crying to C-sections no one can even feel.

Finally, the moment everyone had been waiting for arrived.  Scatterbomb and Stranded in Pittsburgh took the stage together and closed out the night with uproarious laughter.

According to Stranded in Pittsburgh member Thomas, the group has a bit of a fuzzy history.

“It’s a little complicated because we have artifacts from the ‘50s and ‘60s but the club didn’t actually come around till the 90s,” Thomas said.

According to Stranded in Pittsburgh member Jerse, the group was founded as an offshoot of a larger theater club at Fordham University.

“We’re technically part of F.E.T., Fordham Experimental Theater, which I want to say started in the 60s,” she said.   “We’ll say [during the] 2000s it was really rolling.”

Jerse in particular enjoyed the collaborative project of working with Scatterbomb.

“It’s so interesting to learn about the different styles for teams, each team has their little quirks. So I think that was probably the best part, working together with everyone,” she said.

Editor’s note: Scatterbomb member Maria Thomas is The Quadrangle’s Assistant News Editor.

About The Quadrangle (1214 Articles)
The Quadrangle, founded in 1924, is the student-run newspaper of Manhattan College.

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