Faculty and Students Affected by Hurricane Maria

by Victoria Hernandez Editor Seven weeks after Hurricane Maria, the Puerto Rican community at Manhattan College feels a mix of emotions after they experienced the disaster from far away. For Dr. Christie González-Toro, assistant professor of the Department of Kinesiology, seeing the destruction that the hurricane caused to the island was a “roller coaster of emotions.” “I felt agony without knowing of my family and friends … Continue reading Faculty and Students Affected by Hurricane Maria

Who Named The Major Author Reading Series: David Eye Returns to Manhattan College

by RikkiLynn Shields Editor If you’ve ever wondered where the Major Author Reading Series obtained its name, David Eye, former visiting assistant professor of creative writing at Manhattan College from 2010-2013, named the series when he began teaching here seven years ago. Eye grew up in rural Virginia, and earned his MFA in creative writing from Syracuse University in 2008. However, this degree came after working … Continue reading Who Named The Major Author Reading Series: David Eye Returns to Manhattan College

Five Years After Sandy Hook, Enough is Enough

by Rose Brennan Asst. Editor Five years ago and 20 miles from my home, on Dec. 14, 2012, 26 innocent people were gunned down in my home state of Connecticut at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown. For people in my state and my generation, it was almost a phenomenon akin to the previous generation’s Kennedy assassination.  Almost anyone could tell you where they were when … Continue reading Five Years After Sandy Hook, Enough is Enough

Two Seniors Speak About Upcoming December Graduation

by Alexa Schmidt Staff Writer Seniors Hayden Clarke and Lina Bengtson are graduating from Manhattan College this December. They are both are athletes on the track and field team and major in electrical engineering. Clarke is originally from Townsville, Australia, and Bengtson hails from Malmo, Sweden. They started their college career in January, halfway through most freshmen’s first year. “Back at home, the school year finishes … Continue reading Two Seniors Speak About Upcoming December Graduation

A Little Known Holiday

by Haley Burnside Asst. Editor On Nov. 14, the diabetics of the world celebrate World Diabetes Day. This day of recognition is not well known outside of the diabetic community, a community of which I have been a member of since my diagnosis of type 1 diabetes at age four. I have lived with this disease and it’s life-altering complications for as long as I can … Continue reading A Little Known Holiday

Keeping the Faith in a Sports-Obsessed Culture

by C. Garrett Keidel Staff Writer When it comes to the topics of faith and religion, there exists an interesting relationship, one that can be different for each and every single person. The growing trend of secularism in the United States coincides with the ever growing popularity of major league sports. But, this does not mean that there is a negative or inverse relationship between the … Continue reading Keeping the Faith in a Sports-Obsessed Culture

A Woman, A Mother and a Catholic: Meet Natalia Imperatori-Lee

by Lauren Schuster Staff Writer Natalia Imperatori-Lee, Ph.D., an associate professor in the religious studies department at Manhattan College, is a person who embraces her many identities. As a Latina woman, a mother and a Catholic, she is able to offer a unique and refreshing perspective to the study of religion through the courses that she teaches. Some of these courses include “The Nature and Experience … Continue reading A Woman, A Mother and a Catholic: Meet Natalia Imperatori-Lee

We Are Losing Our Religion Study Shows Millennials May Be Least Religious Population Yet

by Ally Hutzler Editor According to a 2016 Pew Research Center study, millennials are much less likely than older Americans to pray or attend church regularly, or even to consider religion an important aspect of their lives. And that number is growing, quickly. The religiously unaffiliated now account for nearly a quarter of the adult population, up from 16 percent in 2007. Michael Hout, a professor … Continue reading We Are Losing Our Religion Study Shows Millennials May Be Least Religious Population Yet

“The Band’s Visit” Brings You to Beit Hatikva

Theater and the City is a column of student-written reviews in the ENGL 400 class taught by Deirdre O’Leary Cunningham. This week’s entry is by Antigone Thanasias.  The most beautiful and memorable moments occur when nothing happens. It’s the silence found when waiting for an overdue phone call. The sweat of your palms when pining to speak to a crush. A feeling of warmth lingering … Continue reading “The Band’s Visit” Brings You to Beit Hatikva