Features

“Race And Feminism: A Conversation” Held by the LWGRC

by Jocelyn Visnov & Zoe DeFazio, Asst. Production Editor & Staff Writer

The Lasallian Women and Gender resource center hosted “Feminism and Race: A Conversation” with Jordan Pascoe, Ph.D., Courtney Bry- ant, Ph.D. and Nefertiti Takla, Ph.D. on April 21.

The intention of the conver- sation was to discuss the ori- gin of oppression and to break down the history of what cre- ated the societal boundaries the world has regarding race and feminism. In addition to that, the conversation was also about current events regarding racial issues that contribute to feminist issues.

The virtual event talked about the fetishization, colo- nization and the psychologi- cal control race has played in the media, such as how Asian women are shown in pornog- raphy as heavily sexual beings, which contributed to Robert Aaron Long’s supposed sex addiction that sparked the At- lanta shooting in March 2021.

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The Lasallian Women and Gender Resource Center hosted “Feminism and Race: A Conversation” with Jordan Pascoe, Ph.D., Courtney Bryant, Ph.D. and Nefertiti Takla, Ph.D. on April 21.

Pascoe, a co-director for the LWGRC, works as a “feminist philosopher.” she also teaches courses in critical race and eth- nicity, women and gender stud-

ies and of course, philosophy. With just over 50 virtual at- tendees present at this event, all of which became engaged in the conversation, Pascoe explained how their talk combined topics taught in several classes beingoffered this semester.
“This event combined Dr.

Bryant’s Womanist Ethics class, Dr. Takla’s Global Fem- inisms class, and my Black Feminist Philosophy class, so we really envisioned it as an interdisciplinar y conversation that brought together our class- es, and our own scholarship in these areas,” she wrote in an email to The Quadrangle. “We met during Dr. Bryant’s class, and our intention was to run it more like a class than a panel, to make space for students to talk withoneanother.Wealsowant- ed to open it up to the college community, as part of the ongo- ing conversations about gender and race that the LWGRC and WAGS have been hosting over the past several years.”

Calissa McNeely, a student in the School of Liberal Arts, shared her thoughts about why this event was a step in the right direction.

“I feel like this conversation needs to happen because some individuals have created a stig- ma around race and feminist is- sues. We have to get to the root

of the problem and discuss it in order to break the stigma,” said McNeely.

Many attendees were students from Dr. Bryant’s womanist ethics class such as Maddy Rapuano, a freshman English major.

“I felt like this experience was rather eye-opening and en- joyable,” Rapuano wrote in an email. “I felt as though this was information I knew prior from previous classes about rape cul- ture and now that culture with a focus on Black women. I would say my biggest takeaway would be the understanding of capital- ism playing a massive role in racism today.”

Despite the often difficult nature of virtual events, Dr. Pascoe explained she was quite pleased with the outcome of the conversation.

“Dr. Takla and Dr. Bryant are brilliant, so it was a sheer joy to get to see them frame these issues, and lead [the] dis- cussion,” Pascoe wrote. “I love my colleagues, but it is pretty rare that we get to teach togeth- er, so that was a real treat, and I learned a lot from both of them. I was delighted by how much the students brought to the ta- ble; hearing their reflections on the case studies we used – the recent Atlanta shootings, and the statistics on race in Title IX

The Lasallian Women and Gender Resource Center hosted “Feminism and Race: A Conversation” with Jordan Pascoe, Ph.D., Courtney Bryant, Ph.D. and Nefertiti Takla, Ph.D. on April 21.

investigations – was incredibly rich and thought-provoking.”

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